Tips on Raising a Lady & a Gentleman

I remember a friend getting a good giggle when my son at the young age of 9 offered his older sister his hand as she stepped out of the car.  She wondered if they were playing some game or other. 

I explained that from early on, my husband and I gently encouraged and actually insisted that our children treat each other and behave as young ladies and gentlemen.  Yes, asking the boys to open doors, to carry things, offer their arm or hand, and to treat their sisters (and mother) with care.  

Our girls were formed to be gracious and to give thanks to their brothers, to refrain from uncaring words, or actions that showed disrespect or crushed the male spirit.  We want independent and confident girls, but also young ladies that treasure the generous and kind actions of valiant fellows.  We want caring and thoughtful young guys who value and respect the opposite sex.

It is easy to let kids cross the line, and in our home we aren’t 100%.  We keep trying though.  We are in a world that reinforces the idea that brothers and sisters are pests, a bother, or simply to be tolerated.  This message is a false one that has been too long made part of modern society.  

Raising our children to be considerate of each other trains them for the future as well.  I want my sons to treat all women as they’ve learned to treat their sisters.  I want my daughters to see themselves as worthy of good treatment and gracious in their behaviour toward men who show them respect and as modelled by their brothers (and father).  

Whatever God intends for my children in terms of calling, they know the glorious dignity with which He created them, male and female. It is in the home they first experienced their distinct personhood and established patterns, of which I hope they will carry well into life.

Politeness, good etiquette, and kind actions, fosters greater attachment between siblings.  Let us change the world!  

What is one manners lesson you learned that you are grateful for and will teach your children?


Therese McDonald